Page 4 - Upper Peninsula Business Today -- December 2017
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PAGE 4 UPPER PENINSULA BUSINESS TODAY DECEMBER 2017
North Oak Manufacturing Creates Items For Homes, Busineses
NEGAUNEE — North Oak Manufacturing began in 1981 when founder Brock Micklow made rolltop secretary desks out of his garage and shipped them all over the world.
“The business grew from there,” said Nicole Richards, North Oak’s office manager.
North Oak Manufacturing is now located along U.S. 41 in Negaunee Township, with the road that leads to the Michigan Iron Industry Museum to its west and Perala Court to its east.
In 2015, Micklow retired, selling the business to two longtime employees, Ken Junak and DJ Manninen, Richards said.
North Oak Manufacturing offers a range of products.
“We do custom wood working, mostly con- sisting of cabinets, countertops, millwork and trim,” Richards said. “We do both residential and commercial work. We do kitchens, vanities for bathrooms, baseboards, crown moldings,
window casing and book shelves. Our commer- cial work is for hospitals, schools, banks, really any type of business.”
North Oak does not manufacture furniture, Richards said.
“On the residential side, we do a lot of kitchens,” she said. “And we have been quite busy with commercial jobs.”
In addition to its owners, North Oak has eight employees.
Via phone at 906-475-7992 or through its website at www.northoakmfg.com, people can gain more information about North Oak.
“Many people don’t realize we have a show- room as part of our building,” she said. “People are welcome to stop in and ask questions.”
North Oak Manufacturing is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday.
One of the many cabinet displays shown at North Oak Manufacturing is shown.
Tips To Ensure Your Holiday Buying Experience Is A Happy One
‘Tis the season to have happy relatives but buy- ing gifts for others can sometimes be a challenge. While we may think our loved one is going to absolutely love that new jacket we bought them that may not always be the case. Afraid your gift may not be the correct style or size? No worries! That’s what gift returns and exchanges are for. Melanie Duquesnel, President and CEO of Bet- ter Business Bureau Serving Eastern Michigan notes, “While those returns make many lives much easier during the holidays, some con- sumers do not realize there are certain steps you must take before returning or exchanging your item. The return process starts well before you give your favorite niece that doll you just know she’s going to adore.” Here are some tips to ensure your holiday buying experience is a happy one.
• Save the receipt. It may seem simple, but many people forget to do this. If you’re giving a gift and you don’t want the recipient to see your entire receipt, you can request a separate gift receipt for specific items. If you’re the gift recip- ient but you’re not sure whether or not you’re going to return/exchange your item, save the receipt somewhere safe but that can be easily remembered. Some retailers will give you store
credit if you lose your receipt, while others will require proof of purchase before agreeing to any exchanges.
• Pay attention to the store’s return policy. Return policies for clearance or holiday mer- chandise may differ from merchandise sold at full price. Every store has its own policy and con- sumers should understand it before expecting a full refund. Remember to do the same for returns on merchandise purchased online. If your gift was purchased online, you may have to pay a return shipping fee, or may not be refund- ed for your initial shipping payment. Some- times merchandise can be returned to a store instead, but you still may not be refunded for the cost of shipping.
• Keeptheoriginalpackaging.Ifyou’reunsure whether or not you are going to keep your gift, make sure you keep the wrapping that your item came in. This goes for tags as well. Make sure you keep all tags on your clothing until after you’ve tried them on and decided whether or not it’s going back to the store. If you open your item and accidently damage the original pack- aging, you are jeopardizing your chances of get- ting a full return. According to USA Today, if the original packaging is damaged or missing,
some stores offer store credit, but will charge you a re-stocking fee. Some stores also charge a small fee if you return an item with a damaged or miss- ing user’s manual.
• Do not return used items. Having second thoughts about a pair of boots you’ve already worn once? Unless the product is defective, used or worn items are usually a return no-no, mean- ing they are non-refundable. Some stores have a more tolerant policy and let you exchange your lightly used items if you’re unhappy with it but you will not get a full refund. This is definitely one of those times you’ll want to check the store’s return policy.
While those returns make many lives much easier
during the holidays, some consumers do not realize there
are certain steps you must take before returning or exchanging your item
Schneider, Larche
Haapala & Co., PLLC
Certified Public Accountants & Consultants
906-786-6151 • 1-800-562-4821
www.slh-cpa.com
401 Ludington Street • Escanaba
David P. Pechawer, CPA - Partner Bruce D. Dewar, CPA - Partner Denise M. Boyle, CPA - Partner Karen L. Meiers, CPA - Partner
• Accounting and Auditing Services
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